Save the Children

Save the Children engaged Jtribe to help create a pilot app for children that aims to raise emergency awareness and empower children to act in an emergency situation.

Starting with a product
 design sprint

Given the projects broad initiatives and KPI’s, we all agreed it would be more effective if we aimed to address the “emergency awareness” space rather than address the infinite user contexts of acting in an emergency situation.

We embarked on a product design sprint to better understand the problem space from field experts and explore ideas that could best equip kids with information that could potentially save lives.

Picking a target

After refining our user journey map to better understand the status quo around current emergency preparedness efforts, our “Decider” chose to focus on the classroom context as research had shown this to be the most influential
 touch point.

With a shared understanding from field experts, we begun to re-frame existing pain points as opportunities. Using a Human-Centered Design process called “How might we’s” (HMW) we defined the pain points. These served as fuel for our solution design concepts.

Existing pain points

  • HMW encourage a positive dialog with parents
  • HMW make emergency awareness exercises more interactive for the kids
  • HMW empower kids to be able to act in an emergency situation

Converted HMW's

  • HMW encourage a positive dialog with parents
  • HMW make emergency awareness exercises more interactive for the kids
  • HMW empower kids to be able to act in an emergency situation

Solution design

We had all proposed a range of different solution design concepts. Some ideas conceptualised were interactive meeting point maps, choose your own path personalised videos, emergency mini-game challenges and AR emergency hazards.

After discussing as a group and collectively reflecting on which concept could best answer some of the HMW questions, we all cast our vote and decided to move forward with the mini-games concept. The basic premise was to “play and plan”, giving users the ability to generate personalised plan’s by playing through emergency mini-game scenarios.

Given the projects broad initiatives and KPI’s, we all agreed it would be more effective if we aimed to address the “emergency awareness” space rather than address the infinite user contexts of acting in an emergency situation.We embarked on a product design sprint to better understand the problem space from field experts and explore ideas that could best equip kids with information that could potentially save lives.

Rapid prototyping

Having one day to prototype a mini-game and a plan seemed like an impossible task. We had to be creative. We re-used and digitally transcribed an existing emergency preparation heuristic called a “Go Bag”. A Go Bag is a bag on standby that’s full of emergency items to assist survival chances. We drew from existing psychological principles around mnemonics, by getting users to relate visual systems and cues to improve memory retention.

Time was running low, so we opted to design a low-fi quiz that aimed to get kids to think about useful items to take if there was a bush fire.

In order to increase engagement, we planned on running an egg timer during the testing sessions to fake the effect of a time constraint. We also mixed in video content to see how video consumption fared against some of the more interactive activities.

Qualitative testing

After 5 user testing sessions, we consolidated each sprint member’s collective observations to reveal some trends that both validated and invalidated parts of our prototype.

What didn't work

  • Videos were perceived poorly and laboursome to sit through 
  • Longer paragraphs and phrases were rarely read 
  • Lack of personalised feedback due to prototype limitations

What worked

  • Interactive mini-games better helped users understand the “why” behind their choices
  • The connection between the mini game and plan was well received
  • Ability to recall and rationalize item selections

Fast forward to today

We used our learnings from the product design sprint to serve as valuable inputs for the initial backlog and MVP. We’re now at the fourth iteration and have continued to evolve and shape the product while securing further funding and doubling some of the learning based KPI’s.

What was originally a low-fi quiz game has evolved and been re-imagined as a highly interactive mini-game where the users try and catch the falling useful items into their “Go Bag” while attempting to discard the irrelevant ones.

Our latest contextual inquiries recorded users being able to recall an average of 7 items to take in an emergency as well as the rationale behind each item. This is triple the amount from the original prototype tests.

Results so far

Download Save the Children App